Cosmic Gypsy Nomad Life

Real Nomad Life With A Sprinkling Of Cosmic S**t

CRITTERS ON THE ROAD

I debated what to post here for … drumroll please … my very first post.

Should I go with my serious side, how profound my nomadic journey has been, what nomadism means to me, how the nomad community is growing in leaps and bounds, what it personally means to be part of such a supportive community?

Should I try to describe how nomadism has changed me on very fundamental levels, physical, emotional, mental and spiritual?

After all, the first blog post is like an introduction of sorts, a first impression that sticks.

I have a comedic side to my personality. As an introvert, your first impression of me is probably quite different … that of a quiet, serious human.

That’s why I’ve decided to go with this lighter post, a collection of critters, as my first post.

Critters on the road is a topic that nomads are WELL acquainted with, especially if their nomadic style involves immersion in nature.

Don’t get me wrong, living close to nature is one of the top reasons I chose this life, but LIVING in nature is a very different exercise than a camping trip that ends back behind the closed doors and windows of traditional housing.

This post is about some of the CREATURES, BUGS, and CRAWLY THINGS that have become part of my nomadic world.

ALL OF THESE PICTURES WERE TAKEN BY ME, OR BY MY PARTNER NANCY. THEY ARE REAL ENCOUNTERS WE’VE HAD WITH WILD THINGS.

To ease you in, let me first introduce you to Norm.

Norm is a desert rat that decided the goodies humans provide outweigh his natural instinct to avoid us as predators.

Norm literally got under our feet when we were cooking!

Norm was cute and entertaining. Too bad other creatures don’t have Norm’s sensibilities.

Here’s a few more creatures I’ve encountered that are pretty cool.

Baby snails. I can’t even.

Free range cows. In camp.

Even lizards are pretty chill.

But then, there’s THIS next level BULLSHIT.

First, this desert centipede. Its bite probably won’t kill you, but it will make you wish you were dead.

And this. BROWN widow. Who knew. There is conflicting info on the poisonousness of its venom, but I’m not about to test it.

The desert doesn’t have a monopoly on danger. Jelly Fish on a CA beach.

Let’s not forget the rattlesnakes. The deadly Mohave, known to be the most aggressive and poisonous snake on the desert, gets pissed off when it sees humans and will CHASE AND KILL YOU just for kicks. The second picture below is the dude that was in our camp chasing my partner Nancy. The snake, not the other dude. Normally we very much practice live and let live, but unfortunately not this time. Please don’t judge.

The neighbor was cool. The Mohave, not so much.

And then we have these nightmares. Both found by Nancy.

FOR THE FINALE, THIS HORROR SHOW IN NANCY’S VAN.

DUN …

Dunnn ….

DUNNNNHHHHHH …

YOU’RE WELCOME.

You may wonder why I even bother to be out in the wilderness, but in two years I’ve only had a few creepy encounters. And full disclosure, the snakes and scorpions always seem to be attracted to Nancy, not me.

Funny thing, I got my first spider bite recently, inside a house, when I was home visiting family! Security is really an illusion and if I let fear of creepy crawly things keep me from being outside it would be a deep loss.

Be careful, stay informed, and enjoy the wild things!

Next

My Not-So-Perfect Van Build

5 Comments

  1. Ariane

    That has to be the most disgusting spider I have ever seen. And I am not affraid of them at all!!!

    • Reikicoach

      Hahahaha! It’s a giant huntsman spider. The Southwest does have some ugly critters! So nice to be in the Northeast for the summer where I can walk barefoot and not worry about the crawly things!

  2. Denise

    Thanks and LOL!!!

  3. Just…no. Except Norm. I love Norm. Thanks for leading with him because…snakes.

    • Reikicoach

      Right!? We’re back in snake/scorpion/creepy spider land! When we were back East we didn’t have to think about bare toes and scorpions!

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